A Miracle in Lansing

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On December 11, in a stunning surprise, Michigan became the 24th state to adopt right-to-work (RTW) legislation, that is, a law that prohibits any union from forcing workers to join or support it. In other words, Michigan has finally allowed people to exercise their right to free association.

This victory for workers’ freedom was amazing in that it was unlike most RTW states — which are mainly Southern states with no deep history of unionization. Like Indiana, the most recent state to adopt RTW legislation, Michigan is a large, upper Midwestern state; and it has long been dominated by union power.  

In fact, Michigan ranks fifth highest on the list of the states in terms of the percentage of its workforce who belong to unions (19.2%, compared to a national average of 11.8%). It has watched as businesses fled the state in droves — especially to Indiana, which after it passed its RTW law picked up 90 companies from Michigan.

The victory was notable for how quickly it occurred. It was only on December 6 that both chambers of Michigan’s legislature passed the Workforce Fairness and Equity Act. Under legislative rules, the state’s Governor Rick Snyder had to wait at least five days before signing the bill, during which time the unions mounted loud, furious, and occasionally violent protests. But the governor signed the law on the first day he could, despite the fact that Snyder had earlier in his term stated that he was not inclined to support RTW legislation.

But the really surprising thing is that Michigan has often been a bastion of the Democratic Party. The state’s citizens voted overwhelmingly for Obama in the recent election (54% to 44%). As surprising as the victory for the RTW law was, however, there were several reasons why the state legislature and governor felt the time was right to free the workers from their union oppression.

First, Michigan has been on an economic road to hell for years, with the crisis of its leading city, Detroit, as just the most striking example. Detroit is now teetering on bankruptcy, in great measure because of the excessive compensation and pension packages that public employee unions enjoy. Michigan has the highest unemployment rate in the Midwest — despite the tens of billions of taxpayers’ dollars that the Obama administration has given to GM, Chrysler, and the United Auto Workers Union.

The unions not only didn’t help to solve the problems, they made it nearly impossible for the governor and legislature to act. In particular, the public employee unions opposed all efforts to institute reasonable fiscal reforms to rescue distressed cities and school districts, virtually shutting down dysfunctional Detroit.

Second, the unions overreached. Seeing nearby Wisconsin cut back on collective bargaining rights for some public employee unions and nearby Indiana adopt an RTW law, Michigan’s unions put a proposition (Prop 2) on the ballot to amend the state constitution to make public employee collective bargaining beyond all legislative control. They also pushed an amendment (Prop 4) that would have forced unionization on all home health workers. Their arrogance in pushing these propositions and their impotence in failing even to come close to passing either one of them made the unions look asinine.

Third, the unions displayed their vicious side too prominently during the legislative debate. As legislators examined the RTW proposal, union supporters screamed “Heil Hitler! That’s what you people are!” at the Republicans speaking in favor of it. The Democratic legislators tried every parliamentary trick to stop a vote, including a Wisconsin-style walkout. A Fox reporter was beaten up by union thugs, and union supporters collapsed a tent owned by Americans for Prosperity (supporters of the legislation) on the people inside it, while screaming insults at them.

The question is now: which states will follow Michigan’s lead?




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Comments

Jon Harrison

Good article, and refreshingly free of overheated rhetoric. Question: did 90 Michigan businesses really pull up stakes and move to Indiana just because the latter became a RTW state? Is there any link or reference out there that corroborates that assertion?

Republicans control the Michigan governorship and both house of the legislature, yet Obama carried the state by ten points. What does that tell us about the national Republican Party and its 2012 standard-bearer, Mitt Romney?

Gary Jason

The links were unfortunately dropped in the piece, but certainly the figure of 90 companies was sourced: it is from a Chicago Tribune story, "Michigan GOP approves right to work amid union protests":, 12/7/2012. Link: www.chicagotribue.com/news/chi-michigan-right-to-work-20121207,0,6331751.

As to what this tells us about Mitt Romney, it tells us that while Obama had hundreds of millions of dollars to spend bashing Romney before Romney was even nominated, the unions had nothing like that much money for their attack machine. It also tells us the Obama and his myrmidons were able to exploit the latent American hatred of Mormonism (America's native equivalent of German anti-Semitism), whereas the union attack machine couldn't do anything like that--Gov. Rick Snyder isn't Mormon. Finally, it tells us that while Obama had ample opportunity to give away massive amounts of taxpayer dollars to buy votes--through dramatic increases in the food stamp, unemployment, student loan and "free" cell phone programs--the unions had no such power.

Clear it up for ya?

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